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Guide to Senior Living in West Virginia

West Virginia is a mountainous and heavily forested state in the rolling Appalachian mountain range. Home to a number of scenic mountain valleys, the state has just under 2 million residents, almost 20% of whom are seniors aged 65 and over. West Virginia was admitted to the Union in 1863, after Virginia’s western counties broke away from the South. Today, the state has several historical sites related to its unusual founding, as well as to the history of labor that followed the Civil War.

West Virginia’s overall cost of living is nearly 22% lower than the national average, which helps seniors pay many of the costs associated with elder care. Seniors in West Virginia pay less than the national average for assisted living and in-home care but nursing home care costs are significantly higher, according to the Genworth 2019 Cost of Care Survey. This guide is written for seniors in West Virginia, as well as their loved ones, to help plan for the likely costs of care and to be aware of available resources in the state.

Paying for Senior Living in West Virginia

Assisted living is a relatively affordable option for many seniors in West Virginia. Compared with the cost of other senior care options, average assisted living prices in the state are moderate. In-home care and home health services, for example, are very close to assisted living in monthly cost, both averaging $3,432 a month, while adult day care costs just $1,083 a month in West Virginia. Nursing home care is an outlier for cost. Across the state, semiprivate rooms in nursing homes average $10,707 a month.

$3750

Assisted Living

$3432

In-Home Care

$3432

Home Health Care

$1083

Adult Day Care

$10707

Nursing Home Care

The Cost of Assisted Living in West Virginia

Assisted living in West Virginia costs seniors an average of $3,750 a month. This is more than $300 under the average monthly cost seniors pay nationally, $4,051. It’s also well under the average cost of assisted living in several nearby states. Of these, Ohio and Virginia are among the most expensive states for assisted living, with average costs of $4,339 and $4,800 a month, respectively. Pennsylvania, though less expensive than some states, still averages higher monthly costs than West Virginia, at $3,913 for assisted living in a senior residential facility. Of the states closest to West Virginia, only Kentucky has a lower average price for assisted living, at just $3,497 a month, or $253 a month less than West Virginia.

$3750

West Virginia

$4051

United States

$4339

Ohio

$3913

Pennsylvania

$4800

Virginia

$3497

Kentucky

The Cost of In-Home Care in West Virginia

Seniors considering in-home care will find that West Virginia is one of the most affordable places to find it. At $3,432, West Virginia is well below the U.S. average for monthly in-home care costs. West Virginia’s neighboring states of Kentucky, Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania report average prices that range from $381 – $953 more than in West Virginia.

$3432

West Virginia

$4290

United States

$4195

Virginia

$3813

Kentucky

$4290

Ohio

$4385

Pennsylvania

The Cost of Nursing Home Care in West Virginia

At $10,707 per month, nursing home care in West Virginia is expensive compared to the U.S average of $7,513—a difference of $3,194  per month. Nursing home care in Pennsylvania costs $974 less than in West Virginia, and other nearby states Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio all have even greater savings for nursing home care, ranging from $3,357 to $3,802 per month. 

$10707

West Virginia

$7513

United States

$7350

Virginia

$6905

Kentucky

$6996

Ohio

$9733

Pennsylvania

Financial Assistance for Senior Living in West Virginia

Personal Care Program

The West Virginia Personal Care Program helps seniors who are eligible for Medicaid get assistance with the activities of daily living in a residential care setting or a senior living facility. The Personal Care Program operates as a waiver for seniors who have a disability or medical condition that could justify placement in a skilled nursing facility, but who choose to waive that placement and remain in a lower level of care.

The program’s scope covers a wide range of seniors’ needs, some of which are self-directed. This means that beneficiaries control how the waiver funds are spent, such as in the hiring of caregivers. Other program services are direct payments from the Personal Care Program’s office to qualifying facilities. Services included in the Personal Care waiver program include personal caregivers, who may be spouses, family or other loved ones of the beneficiary. Caregivers are compensated according to the hours they work, which must be signed off on by the beneficiary. Caregiver assistance can include bathing, dressing and other personal needs, grocery shopping and meal preparation, light housekeeping and other chores.

Seniors in West Virginia may qualify for the Personal Care waiver if they receive or are eligible for Medicaid and have a medical need for caregiver assistance. After receiving the application, a program representative may interview the applicant and inspect the home if the beneficiary intends to stay in a private residence. A set number of hours are then allotted that the program will pay for, which the beneficiary can assign to the caregiver of their choice.

Contact: Call (304) 356-4924 for information about the Personal Care Program. Seniors can also find the Bureau of Senior Services online and download an application packet.

Senior Living Laws and Regulations in West Virginia

Note: All these rules typically apply to non-clinical senior living facilities, such as independent living, assisted living, and memory care facilities. Nursing homes and other senior living facilities with a clinical setting may have additional or slightly different requirements and regulations.

West Virginia’s Bureau for Public Health regulates senior living facilities throughout the state. All senior living communities in West Virginia must apply to this bureau for an operating license, and all licenses must be renewed and kept current for as long as the facility operates. Licensed facilities are inspected for compliance with state regulations in the areas of new resident admissions, Alzheimer’s and memory care, medication management and staff qualifications.

Admission Requirements

Prior to admission, seniors applying to a senior living facility must undergo a comprehensive medical and mental health evaluation. During this exam, a doctor must check for signs of Alzheimer’s disease and other kinds of dementia, as well as take a personal medical history and assess for ongoing medical needs. Seniors may only be admitted to a senior living community if the specific facility is capable of meeting all of the resident’s long-term health needs. Seniors may not be admitted to a senior living facility if they require ongoing IV medication or extensive medical interventions, such as stage III wound care or a chest tube. Exceptions may be made for residents under hospice care, who may remain in a facility with support from a visiting hospice nurse.

A licensed physician must perform medical evaluations prior to admission and then again annually. Residents must also be reassessed whenever a noticeable change in behavior or level of cognition is observed. Results of residents’ medical assessments must be kept on file with the facility, along with a current plan of care.

Memory Care Regulation

Senior living facilities must maintain a separate special care unit, which may be either a discrete unit or a designated wing of the facility, to house and care for residents with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. This wing must be secure with window and door locks to prevent wandering, and staff assigned to this unit must be certified in dementia care.

Medication Management

All senior living residents who are capable of self-administering medications may do so. Noncertified caregiver staff can prompt residents to take their prescribed medications, monitor consumption and assist with preparation of some medication, such as mixing pills into applesauce. Facility staff may assist residents by filling prescriptions at outside pharmacies. Drugs may not be administered by nonclinical staff, but only by certified nursing or medication aides.

No Schedule I drugs are permitted on the premises of a senior living facility in West Virginia. Schedule II and lower prescription drugs may be securely kept on the property, in sealed and measured-dose packs. Controlled substances and narcotics may only be distributed by staff members who are certified to do so and whose scope includes handling and administration of the drugs they have control over. Facilities must keep accurate logs of drug handling, storage, disposal and administration. Nonprescription and over-the-counter medications may be brought into facilities and consumed without supervision or logging provided the resident doing so is capable of safely self-administering medicine.

Staffing Requirements

Senior living facilities with four or fewer residents must have an administrator who is at least 21 years old and a high school graduate. Administrators at larger facilities must also be at least 21 years old, but must also have at least an associate degree in senior care or a related field. Nonmanagement staff at all facilities must be at least 18 years old and have a high school diploma.

Administrators must, in addition to other requirements, undergo at least eight hours of initial training before assuming a management role at the facility. Staff members must receive training in emergency procedures and facility policies no later than the 15th day of employment. Annual continuing education in dementia care must be documented in facility records and available for inspection by the Bureau.

All facilities must keep at least one staff member who is certified in CPR and emergency medical aid on duty at all times. Multistory facilities must have one such employee on duty for each floor. Staff ratios must be sufficient to adequately care for all residents’ needs in a timely manner and to rapidly evacuate a facility in the event of an emergency.

West Virginia Senior Living Free Resources

West Virginia Agencies

West Virginia Medicaid

The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Services administers the state office for Medicaid, the state-federal program for low-income health insurance. Medicaid pays for basic health services, such as preventive care, diagnostic services, needed medical treatments and appliances, and some prescription drugs.

Seniors in West Virginia are automatically eligible for Medicaid benefits if they receive SSI. Seniors who qualify for Medicare may be eligible for dual coverage with Medicaid if they earn less than 100% of the Federal Poverty Line. All Medicaid applicants in West Virginia require proof of citizenship and identity. Adults who earn less than 250% of the FPL may still be eligible for some Medicaid coverage, though share of cost and work requirements may apply.

Contact: Call 1-800-318-2596 for information about Medicaid or to request an application packet by mail. Completed applications may be submitted in person at a social services office, or they may be submitted online.

Area Agencies on Aging in West Virginia

The West Virginia Bureau of Senior Services operates several Area Agencies on Aging around the state. AAA offices assist seniors aged 60 and over with referrals for social services and medical aid. AAA divisions also organize periodic social events to encourage seniors in their local areas to meet up and socialize. West Virginia is divided into four AAA regions. Seniors can find their region on an online map at the Bureau of Senior Services’ website.

AREA AGENCY ON AGINGADDRESSPHONE NUMBER
Region I(Counties: Brooke, Calhoun, Doddridge, Gilmer, Hancock, Harrison, Marion, Marshall, Monongalia, Ohio, Pleasants, Ritchie, Tyler, Wetzel, Wirt, and Wood)Northwestern AAAPO Box 2086 (105 Bridge Street Plaza)Wheeling, WV 26003(304) 242-1800
Region II(Counties: Boone, Cabell, Jackson, Kanawha, Lincoln, Logan, Mason, Mingo, Putnam, Roane, and Wayne)WVSC-Metro AAA 1400 Ohio Avenue, Suite B
Dunbar, WV 25064
(304) 720-6858
Region III(Counties: Barbour, Berkeley, Grant, Hampshire, Hardy, Jefferson, Lewis, Mineral, Morgan, Pendleton, Preston, Randolph, Taylor, Tucker, and Upshur)Upper Potomac AAA 131 Providence Lane
Petersburg, WV 26847
(304) 257-1221 or (800) 296-1221
Region IV(Counties: Braxton, Clay, Fayette, Greenbrier, McDowell, Mercer, Monroe, Nicholas, Pocahontas, Raleigh, Summers, Webster, and Wyoming)Appalachian AAA 1460 Main Street, Box 2
Princeton, WV 24740
(304) 425-1147; or (800) 473-1207

Veterans Affairs Offices in West Virginia

Qualifying veterans and their spouses can visit an office of the West Virginia Department of Veterans Assistance for help navigating the various programs they may be eligible for. Staff at the VA can help senior veterans find state tax and education benefits, federal pension and disability benefits, and preadmission health screening for those entering senior living facilities. The VA operates 16 offices in West Virginia. Honorably discharged veterans who qualify for aid can find their local field office online.

VA OFFICESADDRESSPHONE
Beckley Vet Center201 Grey Flats Road
Beckley, WV 25801
(304) 252-8220
Charleston Vet Center200 Tracy Way
Charleston, WV 25311
(304) 343-3825
Henlawson Vet Center21 Veterans Avenue
Henlawson, WV 25624
(304) 752-4453 Or(877) 927-8387
Huntington Vet Center3135 16th Street Road Suite 11 Huntington, WV 25701(304) 523-8387 Or(304) 523-8387
Martinsburg Vet Center300 Foxcroft Ave. Suite 100A Martinsburg, WV 25401(304) 263-6776 Or(304) 263-6776
Morgantown Vet Center34 Commerce Drive, Suite 101 Morgantown, WV 26501(304) 291-4303
Parkersburg Vet Center2311 Ohio Avenue, Suite D Parkersburg, WV 26101(304) 485-1599 Or(877) 927-8387
Princeton Vet Center1511 North Walker Street Princeton, WV 24740(304) 425-8098
Wheeling Vet Center1058 Bethlehem Blvd. Wheeling, WV 26003(304) 232-0587 Or   (304) 232-0587

Social Security Offices in West Virginia

The Social Security Administration connects West Virginia residents with many of the services they need to remain independent through a network of community offices. Seniors aged 60 and over can contact case managers at a local Social Security office for help signing up for Medicare, SSI and disability benefits. SSA staff can also connect seniors with local and state programs that provide nutritional support, transportation assistance and other benefits they may be eligible for.

Frequently Asked Questions

How much does assisted living cost in West Virginia?

Assisted living in West Virginia costs an average of $3,750 a month. This is $301 a month less than the national average cost of $4,051.

Does West Virginia Medicaid pay for assisted living?

Medicaid provides basic medical insurance for eligible West Virginia residents with low incomes. Though the program doesn’t directly pay for assisted living costs, it can pick up many of the secondary costs associated with senior living. Covered services include preventive care, necessary medical treatments and some prescription drugs.

Does Medicare pay for assisted living?

Medicare doesn’t directly pay for the room-and-board costs of assisted living. Original Medicare does offer coverage under Parts A and B, which help pay for inpatient care and outpatient services, respectively. Some seniors have Part C coverage, which is provided by private insurance companies and may offer services not offered under Original Medicare. It’s best to speak with a plan representative before committing to a senior living plan.

What are “activities of daily living”?

Activities of daily living are the regular chores and daily tasks many seniors need help performing. Caregivers assist seniors with personal hygiene, getting dressed and meal preparation, as well as some housekeeping chores.

What is the difference between assisted living and nursing homes?

West Virginia is a mountainous and heavily forested state in the rolling Appalachian mountain range. Home to a number of scenic mountain valleys, the state has just under 2 million residents, almost 20% of whom are seniors aged 65 and over. West Virginia was admitted to the Union in 1863, after Virginia’s western counties broke away from the South. Today, the state has several historical sites related to its unusual founding, as well as to the history of labor that followed the Civil War.

West Virginia’s overall cost of living is nearly 22% lower than the national average, which helps seniors pay many of the costs associated with elder care. Seniors in West Virginia pay less than the national average for assisted living and in-home care but nursing home care costs are significantly higher, according to the Genworth 2019 Cost of Care Survey. This guide is written for seniors in West Virginia, as well as their loved ones, to help plan for the likely costs of care and to be aware of available resources in the state.

Paying for Senior Living in West Virginia

Assisted living is a relatively affordable option for many seniors in West Virginia. Compared with the cost of other senior care options, average assisted living prices in the state are moderate. In-home care and home health services, for example, are very close to assisted living in monthly cost, both averaging $3,432 a month, while adult day care costs just $1,083 a month in West Virginia. Nursing home care is an outlier for cost. Across the state, semiprivate rooms in nursing homes average $10,707 a month.

  • Assisted Living: $3,750
  • In-Home Care: $3,432
  • Home Health Care: $3,432
  • Adult Day Care: $1,083
  • Nursing Home Care: $10,707

The Cost of Assisted Living in West Virginia

Assisted living in West Virginia costs seniors an average of $3,750 a month. This is more than $300 under the average monthly cost seniors pay nationally, $4,051. It’s also well under the average cost of assisted living in several nearby states. Of these, Ohio and Virginia are among the most expensive states for assisted living, with average costs of $4,339 and $4,800 a month, respectively. Pennsylvania, though less expensive than some states, still averages higher monthly costs than West Virginia, at $3,913 for assisted living in a senior residential facility. Of the states closest to West Virginia, only Kentucky has a lower average price for assisted living, at just $3,497 a month, or $253 a month less than West Virginia.

  • West Virginia: $3,750
  • United States: $4,051
  • Ohio: $4,339
  • Pennsylvania: $3,913
  • Virginia: $4,800
  • Kentucky: $3,497

The Cost of In-Home Care in West Virginia

Seniors considering in-home care will find that West Virginia is one of the most affordable places to find it. At $3,432, West Virginia is well below the U.S. average for monthly in-home care costs. West Virginia’s neighboring states of Kentucky, Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania report average prices that range from $381 – $953 more than in West Virginia.

  • West Virginia: $3,432
  • United States: $4,290
  • Virginia: $4,195
  • Kentucky: $3,813
  • Ohio: $4,290
  • Pennsylvania: $4,385

The Cost of Nursing Home Care in West Virginia

At $10,707 per month, nursing home care in West Virginia is expensive compared to the U.S average of $7,513—a difference of $3,194  per month. Nursing home care in Pennsylvania costs $974 less than in West Virginia, and other nearby states Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio all have even greater savings for nursing home care, ranging from $3,357 to $3,802 per month. 

  • West Virginia: $10,707
  • United States: $7,513
  • Virginia: $7,350
  • Kentucky: $6,905
  • Ohio: $6,996
  • Pennsylvania: $9,733

Financial Assistance for Senior Living in West Virginia

Personal Care Program

The West Virginia Personal Care Program helps seniors who are eligible for Medicaid get assistance with the activities of daily living in a residential care setting or a senior living facility. The Personal Care Program operates as a waiver for seniors who have a disability or medical condition that could justify placement in a skilled nursing facility, but who choose to waive that placement and remain in a lower level of care.

The program’s scope covers a wide range of seniors’ needs, some of which are self-directed. This means that beneficiaries control how the waiver funds are spent, such as in the hiring of caregivers. Other program services are direct payments from the Personal Care Program’s office to qualifying facilities. Services included in the Personal Care waiver program include personal caregivers, who may be spouses, family or other loved ones of the beneficiary. Caregivers are compensated according to the hours they work, which must be signed off on by the beneficiary. Caregiver assistance can include bathing, dressing and other personal needs, grocery shopping and meal preparation, light housekeeping and other chores.

Seniors in West Virginia may qualify for the Personal Care waiver if they receive or are eligible for Medicaid and have a medical need for caregiver assistance. After receiving the application, a program representative may interview the applicant and inspect the home if the beneficiary intends to stay in a private residence. A set number of hours are then allotted that the program will pay for, which the beneficiary can assign to the caregiver of their choice.

Contact: Call (304) 356-4924 for information about the Personal Care Program. Seniors can also find the Bureau of Senior Services online and download an application packet.

Senior Living Laws and Regulations in West Virginia

Note: All these rules typically apply to non-clinical senior living facilities, such as independent living, assisted living, and memory care facilities. Nursing homes and other senior living facilities with a clinical setting may have additional or slightly different requirements and regulations.

West Virginia’s Bureau for Public Health regulates senior living facilities throughout the state. All senior living communities in West Virginia must apply to this bureau for an operating license, and all licenses must be renewed and kept current for as long as the facility operates. Licensed facilities are inspected for compliance with state regulations in the areas of new resident admissions, Alzheimer’s and memory care, medication management and staff qualifications.

Admission Requirements

Prior to admission, seniors applying to a senior living facility must undergo a comprehensive medical and mental health evaluation. During this exam, a doctor must check for signs of Alzheimer’s disease and other kinds of dementia, as well as take a personal medical history and assess for ongoing medical needs. Seniors may only be admitted to a senior living community if the specific facility is capable of meeting all of the resident’s long-term health needs. Seniors may not be admitted to a senior living facility if they require ongoing IV medication or extensive medical interventions, such as stage III wound care or a chest tube. Exceptions may be made for residents under hospice care, who may remain in a facility with support from a visiting hospice nurse.

A licensed physician must perform medical evaluations prior to admission and then again annually. Residents must also be reassessed whenever a noticeable change in behavior or level of cognition is observed. Results of residents’ medical assessments must be kept on file with the facility, along with a current plan of care.

Memory Care Regulation

Senior living facilities must maintain a separate special care unit, which may be either a discrete unit or a designated wing of the facility, to house and care for residents with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. This wing must be secure with window and door locks to prevent wandering, and staff assigned to this unit must be certified in dementia care.

Medication Management

All senior living residents who are capable of self-administering medications may do so. Noncertified caregiver staff can prompt residents to take their prescribed medications, monitor consumption and assist with preparation of some medication, such as mixing pills into applesauce. Facility staff may assist residents by filling prescriptions at outside pharmacies. Drugs may not be administered by nonclinical staff, but only by certified nursing or medication aides.

No Schedule I drugs are permitted on the premises of a senior living facility in West Virginia. Schedule II and lower prescription drugs may be securely kept on the property, in sealed and measured-dose packs. Controlled substances and narcotics may only be distributed by staff members who are certified to do so and whose scope includes handling and administration of the drugs they have control over. Facilities must keep accurate logs of drug handling, storage, disposal and administration. Nonprescription and over-the-counter medications may be brought into facilities and consumed without supervision or logging provided the resident doing so is capable of safely self-administering medicine.

Staffing Requirements

Senior living facilities with four or fewer residents must have an administrator who is at least 21 years old and a high school graduate. Administrators at larger facilities must also be at least 21 years old, but must also have at least an associate degree in senior care or a related field. Nonmanagement staff at all facilities must be at least 18 years old and have a high school diploma.

Administrators must, in addition to other requirements, undergo at least eight hours of initial training before assuming a management role at the facility. Staff members must receive training in emergency procedures and facility policies no later than the 15th day of employment. Annual continuing education in dementia care must be documented in facility records and available for inspection by the Bureau.

All facilities must keep at least one staff member who is certified in CPR and emergency medical aid on duty at all times. Multistory facilities must have one such employee on duty for each floor. Staff ratios must be sufficient to adequately care for all residents’ needs in a timely manner and to rapidly evacuate a facility in the event of an emergency.

West Virginia Senior Living Free Resources

West Virginia Agencies

West Virginia Medicaid

The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Services administers the state office for Medicaid, the state-federal program for low-income health insurance. Medicaid pays for basic health services, such as preventive care, diagnostic services, needed medical treatments and appliances, and some prescription drugs.

Seniors in West Virginia are automatically eligible for Medicaid benefits if they receive SSI. Seniors who qualify for Medicare may be eligible for dual coverage with Medicaid if they earn less than 100% of the Federal Poverty Line. All Medicaid applicants in West Virginia require proof of citizenship and identity. Adults who earn less than 250% of the FPL may still be eligible for some Medicaid coverage, though share of cost and work requirements may apply.

Contact: Call 1-800-318-2596 for information about Medicaid or to request an application packet by mail. Completed applications may be submitted in person at a social services office, or they may be submitted online.

Area Agencies on Aging in West Virginia

The West Virginia Bureau of Senior Services operates several Area Agencies on Aging around the state. AAA offices assist seniors aged 60 and over with referrals for social services and medical aid. AAA divisions also organize periodic social events to encourage seniors in their local areas to meet up and socialize. West Virginia is divided into four AAA regions. Seniors can find their region on an online map at the Bureau of Senior Services’ website.

Table Placeholder

Veteran Affairs Offices in West Virginia

Qualifying veterans and their spouses can visit an office of the West Virginia Department of Veterans Assistance for help navigating the various programs they may be eligible for. Staff at the VA can help senior veterans find state tax and education benefits, federal pension and disability benefits, and preadmission health screening for those entering senior living facilities. The VA operates 16 offices in West Virginia. Honorably discharged veterans who qualify for aid can find their local field office online.

Table Placeholder

Social Security Offices in West Virginia

The Social Security Administration connects West Virginia residents with many of the services they need to remain independent through a network of community offices. Seniors aged 60 and over can contact case managers at a local Social Security office for help signing up for Medicare, SSI and disability benefits. SSA staff can also connect seniors with local and state programs that provide nutritional support, transportation assistance and other benefits they may be eligible for.

Table Placeholder

Frequently Asked Questions

How much does assisted living cost in West Virginia?

Assisted living in West Virginia costs an average of $3,750 a month. This is $301 a month less than the national average cost of $4,051.

Does West Virginia Medicaid pay for assisted living?

Medicaid provides basic medical insurance for eligible West Virginia residents with low incomes. Though the program doesn’t directly pay for assisted living costs, it can pick up many of the secondary costs associated with senior living. Covered services include preventive care, necessary medical treatments and some prescription drugs.

Does Medicare pay for assisted living?

Medicare doesn’t directly pay for the room-and-board costs of assisted living. Original Medicare does offer coverage under Parts A and B, which help pay for inpatient care and outpatient services, respectively. Some seniors have Part C coverage, which is provided by private insurance companies and may offer services not offered under Original Medicare. It’s best to speak with a plan representative before committing to a senior living plan.

What are “activities of daily living”?

Activities of daily living are the regular chores and daily tasks many seniors need help performing. Caregivers assist seniors with personal hygiene, getting dressed and meal preparation, as well as some housekeeping chores.

What is the difference between assisted living and nursing homes?

Assisted living and nursing home care differ in how medically intensive the care is that they offer. Nursing homes employ registered nurses and nurse’s aides to provide IV therapy, administer medication and help residents through physical and occupational therapy, often on short to medium timescales. Assisted living staff are usually caregivers who provide nonmedical assistance with chores and activities of daily living.

Assisted living and nursing home care differ in how medically intensive the care is that they offer. Nursing homes employ registered nurses and nurse’s aides to provide IV therapy, administer medication and help residents through physical and occupational therapy, often on short to medium timescales. Assisted living staff are usually caregivers who provide nonmedical assistance with chores and activities of daily living.

The Top Cities for Senior Living in West Virginia

Learn more about the cost of senior living in the top West Virginia cities. Additionally, find reviews and information about assisted living facilities and other senior living communities across the state.

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